The way we are

Origin meets the future

History really does repeat itself: The enthusiasm for technology and the fun of solving the trickiest tasks attract smart people to EDAG. That was the case with the first apprentice and today still motivates aspiring students combining a degree course with work placement. An unbridled desire for a future in the automotive industry unites both generations.

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At home in the world

EDAG is a global business, but globalisation begins in every single office, where people from different cultures work together to advance intelligent solutions to future issues such as mobility, digitalisation and Industry 4.0. How does the dialogue of cultures work? Answers from the EDAG cosmos by Anna Annuar (Project Engineer/Malaysia), Gabriel Beltran Garza (CAE Engineer/Mexico) and Aaron Lee (Design Engineer/Australia).

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The connection between people and future

We know that people and the future go hand in hand. That one can notcannot exist without the other. Prerequisite is a common orientation with the same values and the same goals. This is how we live and shape the successful transformation of our company and offer our worldwide overmore than 8,600 employees worldwide strength and stability as well as space to get involved and realise themselves.

Living innovations

At EDAG, you contribute to innovations that shape the mobility of tomorrow. Together we set standards: with fresh ideas, new technologies and smart solutions. This innovative strength is a key success factor that we promote at all levels. In a culture of appreciation and togetherness, you can give free rein tolet your ideas run free. We encourage you to think differentlyoutside the box, leave your familiar territory and work with us to find the best solutions to tomorrow's questions.

Balance between work and private life

A healthy balance between work and private life is important. YouIt allows you to stay happy and healthy in the long term. We support you with attractive working time models, time value accounts for time off and child care during the holidays or in special cases.

Promoting career development

It is our goal to attract, educate, and work together with experts over the long-term. This is how we bring EDAG forward together.
With individual development measures, we support you in successfully continuing your expert career at EDAG and rising above yourself. We appreciate your competence, passion and willingness to learn new things.

How can we learn from you and benefit from your know-how? Check our job advertisements now or take the initiative and apply!

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„EDAG is a global company with a 50-year history. And yet things don't get done here in a certain way just because they have always been done that way. Continuous questioning is important to us. So we always keep pace with the times. "As the world changes faster than human beings can change, our good feedback culture and open cooperation across hierarchical levels is becoming increasingly important.“

 

 

 

EDAG Stories

  • History really does repeat itself: The enthusiasm for technology and the fun of solving the trickiest tasks attract smart people to EDAG. That was the case with the first apprentice and today still motivates aspiring students combining a degree course with work placement. An unbridled desire for a future in the automotive industry unites both generations.

     

     

    It was only 50 metres to the office. "They're doing something with cars there", Willi Schwarz remembers his first encounters with EDAG. "The light often burned deep into the night. As teenagers we all found that incredibly exciting." It's the year 1973. After intermediate school, the 16-year-old was deciding on his professional career. Following a work placement during the Christmas holidays, he was convinced, "That's where I will start."

    On 1 September 1973, the time had come: Willi Schwarz is the first apprentice of the design office Horst Eckard, which was founded just four years earlier. "It was very informal, a small team of 10 to 12 people who wanted to do something big together," he enthuses still today. He spent his first few working days tracing clean lines on drawing paper and designing and dimensioning the first parts. "But then I was soon brought in to work on specific projects."

    46 years later, in the anniversary year 2019, Willi Schwarz meets Lisa-Marie Weidemann in Fulda. The 24-year-old aspiring vehicle engineer completed a dual degree course at EDAG and the renowned Hamburg University of Applied Sciences. Just like the first apprentice back then, she is now at the start of her professional career. Except that she is not beginning in a small design office, but in a global company with over 8,600 employees. This raises the question of what these different generations actually have in common? And what does origin mean in regard to shaping the future?

    I'm working on the mobility of tomorrow - I think that's wonderful!

    "I was always interested in technology from childhood, I always wanted to know everything in precise detail," says the student. That probably ran in the family. Her father even worked at EDAG, in the development department headed by Willi Schwarz. Once, when she was a little girl on a Sunday stroll with her scooter, she had wondered why her father was so much faster on his bike. "Force equals mass times acceleration, was his only reply. I never forgot that," says Lisa-Marie Weidemann. "I just have a natural curiosity for technical and mathematical things. Like one time when I was walking around a lake, I wanted to know the easiest way to determine its volume."

    For Willi Schwarz, this is part of the EDAG DNA. "You just have to enjoy what we do here. And you need a good three-dimensional imagination: Before starting work, you should already have a picture of the result in your mind's eye."
    Willi Schwarz also had a clear picture of his own professional advancement in view. He subsequently completed secondary education and, in the early 1980s, studied at the University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg, where Lisa-Marie is currently enrolled. During his studies, he first became acquainted with computer aided design (CAD); for her this was already available at the beginning of her training. "Manual drawing and PC design went hand in hand, with a focus on CAD," relates Lisa-Marie. "That's how times change." Today, in the practical phases of her training she supports the body in white team and develops vehicle doors.
    "As a developer, in everything you do, you always revert to something that previously existed," says Willi Schwarz. "Then there is the question of what we want to transfer and what we want to change," he describes the "mechanics" of innovating. The inevitable result is an inevitable improvement in the project matter. This means that you simply have to do things better. Lisa-Marie has also made this EDAG spirit of continuous improvement her own: "You have to be allergic to stagnation and able to question your own work critically. Are things still the same as we once thought, or does a better or cheaper solution now exist?"

     

    In these times of digitalisation and globalisation, the pace of development has increased in breathtaking fashion, likewise making the hearts of Willi Schwarz and Lisa-Marie Weidemann beat faster. "Ten years ago, autonomous driving seemed to be light years away; today, in terms of technology, it is close enough to touch," says Schwarz. "In order to take decisive action, as developers we must now be able to manage transdisciplinary interfaces. For example, in electronics, which plays an increasingly important role in the overall vehicle. Such as their integration into the chassis components or superstructures and the increasing number of comfort and infotainment offers. That is very demanding. After all, there is no product worldwide that would be nearly as complex at these high volumes."
    For people who want everything to be straightforward and according to plan, these are especially uncomfortable times. "I find that very interesting and incredibly exciting," says Lisa-Marie. A sense of adventure is also part of the attraction for her. She worked in the vehicle test centre in Puebla, Mexico, for two months, where she enjoyed a lot of international encounters. "People from different cultures work hand in hand there and spend the evenings together. I was deeply impressed by this sense of community, openness and very different mentality," she says. For Willi Schwarz it is clear: "If we want to meet the demands of global markets, we have to be on the spot. Placements of this nature are therefore worth their weight in gold. I think it's great that young people have these kinds of opportunities today."

    Willi Schwarz also thinks there is an urgent need to open up the widest possible personal horizons and new ways of thinking in this way: "We are facing a fundamental change in the automotive industry and it is still unclear where the journey will take us: Is the electric motor really the be all and end all or is the fuel cell the answer? Possibly, but then other, completely different new drives may also appear on the scene. And then there is the wide field of networking. For a designer, the environment could not be more exciting."
    Lisa-Marie Weidemann also sees it that way. "I'm working on the mobility of tomorrow - I think that's wonderful!" With her fellow students, she is currently researching a so-called Level 4 vehicle, which drives autonomously but also can be controlled manually. "Our prototype should be in Hamburg in 2021."

  • EDAG is a global business, but globalisation begins in every single office, where people from different cultures work together to advance intelligent solutions to future issues such as mobility, digitalisation and Industry 4.0. How does the dialogue of cultures work? Answers from the EDAG cosmos by Anna Annuar (Project Engineer/Malaysia), Gabriel Beltran Garza (CAE Engineer/Mexico) and Aaron Lee (Design Engineer/Australia).

     

     

    Why is diversity important to you personally?

    Anna Annuar: Different cultures, different backgrounds, different religions, different experiences: Since I work in a multicultural team, all of this is important to me. How do you deal with the weaknesses of others? How do you use the strengths? How do you put the puzzle together? The better you manage that, the better the results of the collaborative work.

    Aaron Lee: As an Australian with Malaysian roots living in Germany, I'm used to being different. That's why for me it's important to work in an inclusive environment like at EDAG that uses the strengths of different cultures. And that spurs me on to get involved and grow personally by learning from others. It goes without saying that I am also learning German and so breaking down the language barrier.

    Gabriel Beltran Garza: I sometimes speak Spanish with my colleagues, sometimes English, sometimes German - more diversity is almost impossible.

     

    How and where do you meet diversity at EDAG?

    Aaron: I experience this every day, not only when communicating with my colleagues on site, but also when working with EDAG engineers from China, Hungary, India, or the UK. It is always important to treat your dialogue partners with respect.

    Anna: We are very intercultural in the teams I work for: there are employees from China, Mexico, America and European countries. About three quarters of my colleagues come from Germany, but there are also big differences here in terms of age, education and background. Working in such teams is always dynamic and never static.

    Gabriel: It is always crucial to succeed in uniting the different nationalities and groups. So that they don't become isolated, but also come closer together as people. At mealtimes, for example: the Indians bring something homemade, the Iranians too. And then you suddenly realise there are similarities to Mexican cuisine. That's awesome!

    In your opinion, are open-mindedness and respect necessary in order to become innovative and successful?

    Anna: I believe every culture has its own strengths. When everyone works together and contributes their experiences and their feelings, there is always an innovative result.

    Aaron: When you have an open mind and respect others' ideas, you can make better decisions together. And thus be more successful.

    How important to you is the appreciation of your work in an international team?

    Aaron: Extremely important. I can only develop my ideas to the full and be a valuable member of the team when I feel good.

    Anna: For me, as a woman wearing a headscarf, it was not easy to find a job in the automotive sector. I am grateful to EDAG for placing its trust in me and giving me responsible tasks. For example, I was allowed to visit one of our major customers. For me, that was a sign of unlimited appreciation for my work.

    Gabriel: I like the open-minded, trusting cooperation at EDAG; that's why I enjoy working here.

    Technology development is still a male domain.Technology development is still a male domain. What do you think?

    Aaron: Industries such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics have already taken important steps towards gender equality. There are more and more women in these areas, but the pace of change is far too slow. There is still a long way to go as regards parity in salaries and management positions. We need more female role models!

    Gabriel: There are too few women in my area too. For many women it is still difficult to find the balance between work and family. But I hope that will change in the next few years.

    Anna: A lot has already been done. EDAG is a very understanding employer. They allow me to work just 35 hours so I can combine work and a family with two children. Incidentally, in my division there is also a team leader who is the boss of a department with pure men. Of course, she is always comparing herself with male executives, but she does very well. In the end, only the quality of work should count.

     

    How do digital networking and social networks influence dialogue in international teams today?

    Aaron: The possibilities of digitalisation have made the world smaller and the processes faster. It means that projects can be handled simultaneously in many different countries, because you can access the resources from anywhere in the world at almost any time. Digital meetings via web conferencing portals are now almost part of daily business, so you can save travelling time.

    Anna: Personal meetings are always very important. For example, having real eye contact with the other employees is a great help when starting a project.

    What does the special EDAG spirit represent for you and why is this spirit understood the same way all over the world?

    Gabriel: At EDAG we all help each other. Like in a family. No matter whether you're dealing with Fulda or with other departments. We are a worldwide team with the same mission.

    Anna: That's right. But I'd like to add something from my own feminine point of view: EDAG is the only company in the automotive sector where I immediately found photos of women on the website. We are not judged by gender here, but by our skills. Also, I always have the opportunity for an open dialogue with my supervisor, which I find very important.

 

 


 

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